Welcome to Touch of Africa!

SPECIALIZING IN HANDMADE ITEMS.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS TO TOUCH YOUR SOUL.

JEWELLERY, PURSES, LOOSE FITTING 100% COTTON CLOTHING, ACCESSORIES AND AROMAS OF INCENSE AND PERFUME OILS FOR ANY TASTE – AND MUCH MORE. 

Touch of Africa is an award-winning presenter at the PNE and BC Home Show.

For those seeking a touch of exotic untamed cultures of Africa, we offer a variety of items to tempt your pallet: masks, pictures, wall hangings and batiks to decorate your walls and African teak, mahogany and ebony furnishings to add spice to your home. Statues and ceremonial carvings are available to peek from your corners.

We have musicals instruments and music to touch your soul. African fashion for comfort and to show the beauty in you along with jewelry, purses and accessories to accent the exotic in you. Aromas of incense and perfume oils for all tastes, African Shea Butter and Black Soap to heal your body. Learn the meaning behind the works of art you obtain. Come journey with us through the history of Africa. We welcome you.

Omar Thiam and Touch Of Africa were showcased at the SFU Gallery From February through May, 2009 – celebrating Black History Month in British Columbia from 1858 to 2009, featuring prominent people and businesses that have made an impact in British Columbia and helped preserve African Heritage.

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Trade With a Touch of African Fairness

Touch of Africa believes in fair trade. People around the world have the right to an honest living that brings dignity and joy to their lives. Touch of Africa creates healty business relationships with talented Africans by promoting fair trade.

Through “fair trade” principles, Touch of Africa returns the respect, dignity, hope and fair value to the people we partner with – in return for the hard work hard they have created for your benefit.

 

SHIPPING INFORMATION

$19.95 BY CANADA POST FOR ORDERS UNDER $100.00.

ORDERS FOR $100.00 OR MORE SHIP FOR FREE EXECPT AS NOTED BELOW

UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED SHIPPING AND HANDLING CHARGES APPLY TO All ORDERS.

ADDITIONAL CHARGES WILL BE APPLIED FOR HEAVY OR LARGE ITEMS SUCH AS FURNITURE.

LOCAL CUSTOMERS WHO WISH TO PICK UP THEIR ORDERS, OR CUSTOMERS WHO WOULD LIKE TO ARRANGE THEIR OWN SHIPPING – PLEASE CONTACT US BY PHONE OR EMAIL.

We offer worldwide shipping by UPSFedx, or Canada Post.
Our default shipping is by Canada Post.

Phone orders require a signed Credit Card Authorization Form.
Click Here to download the form in pdf format.

NEWS & ARTICLES

Goree Island: The door Of No Return.

The date remembers Goree Island. This land mass played an important part in the early days of African American history. Goree Island is a small 45-acre island located off the coast of Senegal. Goree Island was developed as a center of the expanding European slave trade.

The first record of slave trading there dates back to 1536 and was conducted by Portuguese, the first Europeans to set foot on the Island in 1444. The house of slaves was built in 1776. Built by the Dutch, it is the last slave house still standing in Goree and now serves as a museum. The island is considered as a memorial to the Black Diaspora.

An estimated 20 million Africans passed through the Island between the mid-1500s and the mid-1800s. During the African slave trade, Goree Island was a slave-holding warehouse, an absolute center for the trade in African men, women and children. Millions of West Africans were taken against their will. These Africans were brought to Goree Island, sold into slavery, and held in the holding warehouse on the island until they were shipped across the Atlantic Ocean. They were sold in South America, the Caribbean, and North America to create a new world. The living conditions of the slaves were atrocious on Goree Island.

Human beings were chained and shackled. As many as 30 men would sit in an 8-square-foot cell with only a small slit of window facing outward. Once a day, they were fed and allowed to attend to their needs, but still the house was overrun with disease. They were naked, except for a piece of cloth around their waists. They were put in a long narrow cell used for them to lie on the floor, one against the other. The children were separated from their mothers. Their mothers were across the courtyard, likely unable to hear their children cry. The rebellious Africans were locked up in an oppressive, small cubicle under the stairs; while seawater was sipped through the holes to step up dehydration

Above their heads, in the dealer’s apartments, balls and festivities were going on. But even more poignant and heart wrenching than the cells and the chains was the small “door of no return” through which every man, woman and child walked to the slave boat, catching a last glimpse of their homeland.

When the French abolished slavery in 1848, 6000 persons, 5000 of them former captives were living on the island. Designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to be a World Heritage Site, Goree Island in the 21st century retains and preserves all the traces of its terrible past.

The main Slaves’ House built in 1777 remains in tact with cells and shackles, the Historical Museum, the Maritime Museum, residential homes and forts are all standing too. The Island today has about 1000 residents.

Reference:
Africana The Encyclopedia of the African and
African American Experience.

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